January 15, 2014
The list of 2013 National Jewish Book Award winners and finalists can be found here.

The list of 2013 National Jewish Book Award winners and finalists can be found here.

January 13, 2014

Rachel Cantor writes about Borges, literature, kabbalah, and the aleph here.

December 19, 2013
"Claudia Roth Pierpont, when introduced to Philip Roth about a decade ago, ‘blurted out’ her admiration for his books. After some wariness, he came to trust her to read drafts of his final short fictions."

— Alan Cooper in his review of Roth Unbound

December 18, 2013
Stephen Dixon is, in my opinion, the best and most overlooked American Jewish fiction writer in the country. If I left out “Jewish,” he would still be the best. He has just published his 32nd book, a novel entitled His Wife Leaves Him, which is partly based on the death of his own beloved wife.
Continue Reading

Stephen Dixon is, in my opinion, the best and most overlooked American Jewish fiction writer in the country. If I left out “Jewish,” he would still be the best. He has just published his 32nd book, a novel entitled His Wife Leaves Him, which is partly based on the death of his own beloved wife.

Continue Reading

October 21, 2013
Jewish Book Month begins this week! What are you reading to celebrate?
Order a kit here

Jewish Book Month begins this week! What are you reading to celebrate?

Order a kit here

October 3, 2013
We just announced the five finalists for the 2014 $100,000 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature. Read about the books here.

We just announced the five finalists for the 2014 $100,000 Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature. Read about the books here.

July 15, 2013
From “Top 5 American Jewish Women Most People Have Never Heard Of (But Should Have):
Maud Nathan (1862-1946) took pride in her heritage as the daughter of an elite Sephardic Jewish family. Married to her cousin Frederick Nathan, she was involved in multiple organizations and causes in New York, including the National Consumers’ League and the National Council of Jewish Women. Nathan, a gifted speaker and parliamentarian, earned especial fame for her suffrage activism on both the national and the international stage. She believed that Jewish women had a special civil responsibility that could best be demonstrated through social reform and political participation.
Read about four more inspiring American Jewish Women here.

From “Top 5 American Jewish Women Most People Have Never Heard Of (But Should Have):

Maud Nathan (1862-1946) took pride in her heritage as the daughter of an elite Sephardic Jewish family. Married to her cousin Frederick Nathan, she was involved in multiple organizations and causes in New York, including the National Consumers’ League and the National Council of Jewish Women. Nathan, a gifted speaker and parliamentarian, earned especial fame for her suffrage activism on both the national and the international stage. She believed that Jewish women had a special civil responsibility that could best be demonstrated through social reform and political participation.

Read about four more inspiring American Jewish Women here.

July 12, 2013
"When it comes to 20th-century Jewish authors, it’s Bellow, Roth, and Salinger who generally grab headlines. But their immediate predecessors—Delmore Schwartz and Nathanael West—worked in an era that will always captivate me." - Ilan Mochari, "West and Schwartz, Dreaming at the Movies”

"When it comes to 20th-century Jewish authors, it’s Bellow, Roth, and Salinger who generally grab headlines. But their immediate predecessors—Delmore Schwartz and Nathanael West—worked in an era that will always captivate me." - Ilan Mochari, "West and Schwartz, Dreaming at the Movies

July 11, 2013
Carolyn: The Art Forger (B.A. Shapiro) | Naomi: Herzog (Saul Bellow) Mimi: The Invisible Bridge (Julie Orringer) | Emma: Jerusalem (Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi) Carol: The Golem and the Jinni (Helene Wecker) | Miri: May We Be Forgiven (A.M. Homes)

Carolyn: The Art Forger (B.A. Shapiro) | Naomi: Herzog (Saul Bellow)
Mimi: The Invisible Bridge (Julie Orringer) | Emma: Jerusalem (Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi)
Carol: The Golem and the Jinni (Helene Wecker) | Miri: May We Be Forgiven (A.M. Homes)

June 26, 2013
Ruth Franklin reviews David Roskies and Naomi Diamant’s Holocaust Literature and points out that there are some interesting inclusions—and exclusions:
http://bit.ly/18gacu4
What titles would you include on a Holocaust literature reading list?

Ruth Franklin reviews David Roskies and Naomi Diamant’s Holocaust Literature and points out that there are some interesting inclusions—and exclusions:

http://bit.ly/18gacu4

What titles would you include on a Holocaust literature reading list?

Liked posts on Tumblr: More liked posts »